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Writing Evaluation Report of a Project

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Plan your report

Importance of an Evaluation Report
Quiz & Worksheet Goals
Consider your audience

Gather and review all of the data used to conduct the evaluation. While reviewing the data, you should have some idea of what the report will say and what conclusions will be presented. Identify the key stakeholders for the report. These will include those who will read the report and have a stake in its findings. Stakeholders vary but often include the heads of the organization, clients, suppliers, financial backers and employees.

Because stakeholders are your audience, keep their questions and concerns in mind as you write the report. Make notes of the conclusions that become apparent as you review the data. As you compile the data and write the report, it's normal for new conclusions to become apparent. Keep an open mind and let the data shape the report, rather than emphasizing data that fits your own preconceptions or the goals of the stakeholders. Write down the heading for the "Summary" or "Executive Summary.

Use this section to summarize the most important points in the report after you have completed the other sections.

Write a "Background" section detailing the reasons why the evaluation was performed. Highlight findings and recommendations from previous evaluations that lead to this report. Write a "Scope" section describing what was evaluated and the dates the evaluation was performed.

Write an "Evaluation Process" section describing the steps that were taken during the evaluation and listing tools and resources used. If more than one evaluation was performed, the process for each should be described separately. Write an "Evaluation" section for each evaluation performed. These may be different types of evaluations on the same subject or different subjects being evaluated.

For example, one person may have performed telephone interviews, and a website may have been analyzed. Other than the Appendix, the Evaluation sections are usually the longest and most highly detailed. Write a "Recommendations" section, listing recommendations from each evaluation. While each evaluation can have its own list of recommendations, summarize the most important recommendations in a succinct list that can be easily read and understood by all stakeholders.

She'll just explain each criterion that she will use to evaluate the program. After explaining each criterion with which Shondra is evaluating the program, she will want to explain how the program meets the criteria.

In this section, she will want to include a subsection for each criterion and how the program meets, or does not meet, that requirement.

For example, in the subsection on participation in town events, she can talk about how senior participation has increased and by how much. In the conclusions section, Shondra will summarize how the program has lived up to its evaluation, or hasn't lived up to it. She might, for example, say that, even though the senior ride program costs the city a considerable amount of money, many seniors take advantage of it, which has led to a decrease in traffic accidents caused by older drivers and an increase in senior participation in town events.

Shondra might choose to create a summary table in this section with each criterion and how the program did for that criterion. That makes a nice, visual way to present information about the evaluation. By this point, Shondra's opinion of the program should be pretty clear. But this is the section where she recommends that the program continue or not. Before this, she's evaluated it, but now she applies that evaluation. Based on her evaluation, for example, she might recommend that the city keep the program, even though it costs money.

Get access risk-free for 30 days, just create an account. Shondra has written all six parts of the evaluation report, but that's a lot of information. The report is very long, and she wonders how she can structure the paper to make it easier to read. There are generally two ways to structure an evaluation report: The traditional organization of a paper involves putting the sections in the order we just learned about them.

That is, the introduction comes first, followed by the background information, and then the criteria, evaluation, and conclusions sections, and finally, the recommendation section. This structure probably seems pretty familiar to you.

That's because it is very similar to the way school reports are written, with an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. Each section builds upon the last section, making it logical and easy to read. But Shondra is writing for the mayor of her town, and he's a busy man. He doesn't have time to read through her entire very long report to get to the bottom line. The executive organization of a paper begins with the introduction, conclusions, recommendation, and then the background information, criteria, and evaluation are included at the end, often as appendices.

This structure is called the executive structure because busy executives, and, in Shondra's case, a busy mayor, don't have a lot of time. This places the most important information up front and puts the explanations and processes near the end. An evaluation report is a paper that examines whether a product, service, or process is working, according to a set of standards. It includes an introduction, background information, criteria, evaluation, conclusions, and recommendation.

It can be structured using traditional organization , which puts the sections in the following order: Alternatively, an evaluation report can be structured using an executive organization , which puts the conclusions and recommendation sections immediately after the introduction.

The executive structure allows busy professionals to get to the bottom line of the paper faster. Creating an evaluation report is a way to see whether a product, service, or process is working according to a set of standards. The report can be rather lengthy, but there are two common formats that would be easily comprehended: To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.

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The videos on Study. Students in online learning conditions performed better than those receiving face-to-face instruction. By creating an account, you agree to Study. Explore over 4, video courses. Find a degree that fits your goals. How to Write Evaluation Reports: In this lesson, we'll examine the evaluation report, including what they are, how they are used in business, what information is included in them, and how they are organized.

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Evaluation Reports Shondra is a consultant, and she just got a very exciting phone call. Content Shondra needs to evaluate the senior free ride program and then write a report for the mayor and town council.

The sections of an evaluation report are: Introduction In this section, the situation is introduced. Background information Shondra will want to make sure that everyone who reads her report has all the background information necessary to understand it. Criteria Shondra will also want to make clear the way she's evaluating the program. Evaluation After explaining each criterion with which Shondra is evaluating the program, she will want to explain how the program meets the criteria.

Conclusions In the conclusions section, Shondra will summarize how the program has lived up to its evaluation, or hasn't lived up to it.

Recommendation By this point, Shondra's opinion of the program should be pretty clear. Try it risk-free No obligation, cancel anytime. Want to learn more? Select a subject to preview related courses: Structure Shondra has written all six parts of the evaluation report, but that's a lot of information. Lesson Summary An evaluation report is a paper that examines whether a product, service, or process is working, according to a set of standards.

Lesson at a Glance Creating an evaluation report is a way to see whether a product, service, or process is working according to a set of standards. Traditional organization is similar to that of school reports with an introduction, body, and conclusion. Learning Outcomes After reading about evaluation reports in this lesson, you should be able to: Describe the six components that comprise an evaluation report Compare and contrast reports structured using traditional organization and executive organization.

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Developing an effective evaluation report: Setting the course for effective program evaluation. Atlanta, Georgia: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National .

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Writing an evaluation report helps you share key findings and recommendations with internal and external stakeholders. A report can be used to suggest changes to how you work, to communicate your value to funders, or to .

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How to Write an Evaluation Report An evaluation is an assessment of certain topics or subjects typically conducted for a specific purpose. An evaluation report, in the simplest sense, is a document which reports the results, findings, interpretations, conclusions, or recommendations derived through an evaluation. Shondra will be writing an evaluation report, which is a paper that examines whether a product, service, or process is working, according to a set of standards. The purpose of the paper is to evaluate a product, service, or process, hence the name.

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Writing Evaluation Report of a Project A clear, concise, brief and yet complete guide on writing mid-term or final evaluation report for a Project of any kind. The format is also available in MS Word format and can be downloaded from . Jun 27,  · Writing the Evaluation Report. Write down the heading for the "Summary" or "Executive Summary." This is the first section of most evaluation reports but is usually written last. Use this section.