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Essay/Term paper: Gender roles

Gender Roles

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When gender stereotypes fail
Essay, term paper, research paper: Gender

However, this is not to say that traditional roles, reversed roles, or anything in between are inherently bad. More research is needed to better understand the influences of genetics and environment on the acquisition of gender roles and the ways in which different types of gender roles support the stability and growth of society. Gender roles have changed in many ways throughout history as well as within recent memory.

In the s, for example, little girls were said to be made of "sugar and spice and everything nice" and wore pastel organdy dresses and gloves to church. In the s and s, however, this all changed for many women; bras were discarded, and patched jeans became de rigueur.

In fact, each succeeding generation has brought with it differing expectations for how men and women should act within society. Despite these changes, however, the truth is that modern society still has expectations for how men and women are to act.

Although we may be more open to exceptions than were past generations, there still are expected norms of behavior for women and men in society. In biosocial terms, gender is not the same as sex. Gender refers to the psychological, social, cultural, and behavioral characteristics associated with being female or male. Gender is defined by one's gender identity and learned gender role.

Sex, on the other hand, refers in this context to the biological aspects of being either female or male.

Genetically, females are identified by having two X chromosomes and males by having an X and a Y chromosome. In addition, sex can typically be determined from either primary or secondary sexual characteristics. Primary sexual characteristics comprise the female or male reproductive organs i. Secondary sexual characteristics comprise the superficial differences between the sexes that occur with puberty e. It is relatively easy to see that biology has an impact on gender and the subsequent actions and behaviors that are thought to be more relevant to either females or males.

For example, no matter how much a man might want to experience giving birth, the simple fact is that he cannot, except as an observer. From this fact it is easy if not necessarily logical to assume that biology is destiny and, therefore, women and men have certain unalterable roles in society—for example, that women are the keepers of home and hearth because of their reproductive role, while men are the protectors and providers because of their relatively greater size and strength.

However, before concluding that biology is destiny in terms of gender roles, it is important to understand that not only do gender roles differ from culture to culture, they also change over time within the same culture. Early 20th-century American culture emphasized that a woman's role was in the home.

As a result, many women did not have high school educations and never held jobs; instead, they quite happily raised families and supported their husbands by keeping their households running smoothly. Nearly a century later, this gender role is no longer the norm or at least not the only acceptable norm and sounds quite constricting to our more educated, career-oriented 21st-century ears.

If biology were the sole determinant of gender roles, such changes would not be possible. In 21st-century United States culture, gender roles continue to be in a state of flux to some extent, although traditional gender roles still apply in many quarters.

For example, boys are often encouraged to become strong, fast, aggressive, dominant, and achieving, while traditional roles for girls are to be sensitive, intuitive, passive, emotional, and interested in the things of home and family.

However, these gender roles are culturally bound. For example, in the Tchambuli culture of New Guinea, gender roles for women include doing the fishing and manufacturing as well as controlling the power and economic life of the community. They are encountered in the workplace, in the home, in every facet of life. Women have made advances toward the equality they seek only to encounter a backlash in the form of religious fundamentalism, claims of reverse discrimination by males, and hostility from a public that thinks the women's movement has won everything it wanted and should thus now be silent.

Both the needs of women today and the backlash that has developed derive from the changes in social and sexual roles that have taken place in the period since World War II. These changes involve the new ability of women to break out of the gender roles created for them by a patriarchal society. The desperation women feel has been fed throughout history by the practice of keeping women in their place by limiting their options. This was accomplished on one level by preventing women from gaining their the sort of education offered to men, and while this has changed to a great extent, there are still inequalities in the opportunities offered to men as opposed to women.

The sad history of prohibitions on women's learning is too well known to be recorded here. In much of the world women are barred from advanced knowledge and technical training Yet opening the world of business with new opportunities for women does not dissipate much of this frustration because both men and women continue to be ruled by their early training, by the acculturation process which decides for them what sort of existence they will have.

This can result in feelings of guilt when their reality and the image they have been taught from childhood do not mesh. It would be a mistake to see changing gender roles in society as threatening only to males who dominate that society. Such changes also threaten many women who have accepted more traditional roles and see change as a threat. I think time are harder for women these days. When women first united for the right to vote at the beginning of this century, they were opposed by women's groups who wanted things to remain as they were.

Many of these women were ladies of means and social position in society: The main burden of their argument was that woman suffrage placed an additional and unbearable burden on women, whose place was in the home. These arguments are heard today from religious fundamentalists who believe that the women's movement is a threat to the family. The fact is that the family has changed and that the traditional family structure of homemaker, husband as breadwinner, and children bow constitutes only 10 percent of families.

The role for women has expanded with more women in the workplace and with a variety of family structures with new roles for all members of the family. Business has been slow to change and to acknowledge the new family, and for all the complaints about the women's movement as anti-family, the movement has instead followed the trend of placing the family in the forefront of addressing family issues as vital to women.

There is much evidence that boys and girls are treated differently form birth, and this fact has been noted in every world culture: It may never be possible to separate out the precise effects of physiology and cultural conditioning on human beings. Not only do they individually influence people but they interact with each other and with each person's unique essence to affect human behavior.

To accord with the reality of this complex interplay of factors, and to accord with an increasingly complex external world, feminists ask simply for options in life styles. Those stuck in sexism, however, cannot grant even the simple request to ask why women are inferior. The reason sexism exists at all is because of an acculturation process which subtly creates it, and it is perpetuated in part for that reason and also because perceived changes in the roles and status of women create a backlash based on fear of change.

Surveys have shown that identical resumes or scholarly articles are rated lower if the applicant is though to be a woman rather than a man: Women who do not advance only confirm the stereotype for others: The perception remains that women can't make it by conventional standards, or are less committed to doing so. In either event, they do not seem to warrant the same investment in training, assistance, and promotion opportunities as their male counterparts. Feminist theorists have been calling for some time for a change in the political climate.

They want more than just more women in office and the political arena; they want a new type of political thinking, one that empowers people rather than government and that addresses the issues that are of importance to men and women: This new human liberation will enable us to take back the day and the night, and use the precious and limited resources of our earth and the limitless resources of our human capital to erect new kinds of homes for all our dreams.

The perception the public has had on the role of men and women is outdated and has been for some time, but public attitudes change slowly even in the face of overwhelming evidence. More than 40 years ago, anthropologist Margaret Mead noted the way the West had developed its concept of male and female: There has long been a habit in Western civilization of men to have a picture of womanhood to which women reluctantly conformed, and for women to make demands on man to which men adjusted even more reluctantly.

This has been a accurate picture of the way in which we have structured our society, with women as keepers of the house who insist that the man wipe their feet on the door-mat, and men as keepers of women in the house who insist that their wives should stay modestly indoors.

Today, people are far less willing to accept these artificial roles even reluctantly, and this includes the provision keeping women in the home and out of the public arena. To have more women in office it is necessary to have more women run. As noted, public views change more slowly than the reality of gender roles.

They will continue to change slowly as long as we continue acculturating children with the same sexual stereotypes that have so long prevailed. It is necessary that we address this issue from early childhood, with parents demonstrating a different view of gender and sexual roles just as the school and church should take a part in eliminating the old stereotypes in favor of a more reasonable and equitable way to view both men and women.

Gender roles Essay, term paper, research paper: Gender See all college papers and term papers on Gender. Need a different custom essay on Gender? Buy a custom essay on Gender.

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Genetic data vs. sociocultural gender roles

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Gender Roles. Women and men have extremely different roles in society. These gender. roles are very evident in the way we see ourselves as women, which is. based on how we have been treated in the past and the actions in. history we have taken toward gender equality.

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Persuasive essay – Gender roles. Within this essay I will prove that gender roles are still a massive part of our society and that people claiming equal rights and equal privileges are fighting a losing battle–if not are actually hurting their own cause.

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This essay on gender roles and stereotypes was written in defense of women. Learn why many of the preconceived beliefs society has about women are false.4/5(12). Jan 30,  · Gender Roles in Society Essay. 1. Gender Roles in Society Essay Sociology: Gender and Class Gender Role, often determined by their culture's gender stereotypes. Gender roles also show ideal, should-be, and desirable behaviors for men and women who are occupying a particular position or involving in certain social activities.

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Gender identity is referring to individual identifying with certain gender and gender roles in the society. This essay seeks to describe the gender roles and its significance in the society. Gender Identity. Gender role discrimination may be considered by many to be nonexistent to today's society and that equality between the sexes has been achieved. Gender roles and relations still play a part in perpetuating inequality, and the effects of gender roles in relation to childhood, family life and at work.